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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Life After

As you recover from your short-term treatment for VTE, you will need to follow up with your doctor regularly to monitor your condition and discuss whether you need to continue taking blood-thinning medicines. You will also want to take steps to prevent a repeat VTE event and be aware of possible long-term complications.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Treatment

Not everyone who is diagnosed with VTE needs treatment. In some cases, your doctor will detect a clot and decide to monitor it instead of treating it right away. Doctors usually recommend medicines to treat VTE, but a vena cava filter may be used if you cannot take the medicine.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Diagnosis

Your doctor will diagnose deep vein thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism based on your medical history, a physical exam, and various imaging or blood test results.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Signs, Symptoms, and Complications

Sometimes VTE does not cause symptoms until serious complications occur. In other cases, deep vein thrombosis causes swelling or discomfort near the blood clot. Pulmonary embolism can cause chest pain and difficulty breathing. Pulmonary embolism can be a life-threatening condition.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Screening and Prevention

There are no methods to screen for VTE. If you are preparing to go to the hospital for a procedure or have other risk factors for VTE, talk with your doctor about a plan for preventing blood clots from forming.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Risk Factors

Risk factors for VTE include a history of a previous VTE event; surgery; medical conditions such as cancer or spinal cord injury; pregnancy; paralysis or long periods of immobilization; specific genes; and certain circumstances related to age, race, and sex. In most cases of VTE, there is more than one risk factor involved. The more risk factors you have, the greater the chance you have of developing VTE.

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NHLBI

Venous Thromboembolism - Causes

VTE occurs in the veins that carry blood to your heart. Blood clots can develop in veins damaged by surgery or trauma, or a result of inflammation in response to an infection or injury.

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ACF

Unaccompanied Alien Children Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions about the increase in unaccompanied alien children (UACs) crossing the southwest border of the U.S.

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ACF

Gallery

About Unaccompanied Alien Children Gallery

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NHLBI

Defibrillators - Living With

Automated External Defibrillator (AED)  Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)  Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillator (WCD) 

After sudden cardiac arrest, surgery to implant an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or a fitting for a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD), you will need regular visits with your doctor to check your condition, the device, or any medicines you are taking. You can get an ID card with information about your device to keep with you. It can be helpful in an emergency, to show airport security, or for medical personnel who need to know more about your device. If you have an ICD, be aware of the signs of complications with your device.

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