HHS Syndication Storefront

The HHS Syndication Storefront allows you to syndicate (import) content from many HHS websites directly into your own website or application. These services are provided by HHS free of charge.

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OWH

Oral health

gum disease  oral health  dentist  Women’s health  floss  brushing 

Women have unique oral health concerns. Regular brushing, flossing, and dentist visits can help prevent disease in your mouth and the rest of your body.

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OWH

Myasthenia gravis

women's health  muscle weakness  Myasthenia gravis  MG  myasthenic crisis  MG diagnosis  MG symptoms  MG treatments 

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that weakens the muscles. Learn about myasthenia gravis from the Office on Women’s Health.

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OWH

Migraine

Migraine  Women’s health  migraine with aura  migraine without aura  migraine symptoms  migraine treatments 

Migraine is very common and affects women more than men. Learn about migraine from the Office on Women’s Health.

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NCI

Strategic Planning at NCI

NCI’s strategic goals and priorities aim to direct progress against cancer to meet the needs of all people. Learn how priorities are set and how funding decisions are made at NCI.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Women and Heart Disease

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death for women. About 80% of women ages 40 to 60 have one or more risk factors for coronary heart disease. Having multiple risk factors significantly increases a woman’s chance of developing coronary heart disease.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Living With

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

If you have been diagnosed with coronary heart disease, it is important that you continue treatment plan. Get regular follow-up care to control your condition and prevent complications.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Treatment

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

Your treatment plan depends on how severe your disease is, the severity of your symptoms, and any other health conditions you may have. Possible treatments for coronary heart disease include heart-healthy lifestyle changes, medicines, or procedures such as coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Diagnosis

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

Your doctor will diagnose coronary heart disease based on your symptoms, your medical and family history, your risk factors, and the results from tests and procedures. Because women and their doctors may not recognize coronary heart disease symptoms that are different from men’s, women may not be diagnosed and treated as quickly as men. It is important to seek care right away if you have symptoms of coronary heart disease.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Signs, Symptoms, and Complications

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

Some people have severe symptoms of coronary heart disease. Others have no symptoms at all. If you have “silent” coronary heart disease, you may not have any symptoms until you have a heart attack or other complication.

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NHLBI

Coronary Heart Disease - Screening and Prevention

coronary artery disease  coronary heart disease  coronary microvascular disease 

You should start getting screening tests and risk assessments for coronary heart disease around age 20 if you do not have any risk factors for coronary heart disease. Children may need screening if they have risk factors, such as obesity, low levels of physical activity, or a family history of heart problems. Afterward, your doctor may recommend preventive treatments such as heart-healthy lifestyle changes to help you lower your risk of coronary heart disease.

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