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NIDDK

Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

cancer  digestive system diseases  patients  tumors  tumor  stomach  Digestive Diseases  Diarrhea  Gastrinomas  Helicobacter pylori  Gastric Acid  Small Intestine  Peptic Ulcers  Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs  Gastroesophageal reflux  Pancreas  Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia  Gastrin Level  Proton pump inhibitors  Duodenum 

Learn about Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, in which tumors in the pancreas or duodenum increase stomach acid, leading to peptic ulcers, acid reflux, and diarrhea.

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CDC

Infectious disease Campylobacter general information

arthritis  campylobacter  meningitis  campylobacteriosis  Helicobacter pylori  Urinary Tract Infection  Pancreatitis  Campylobacter infections  Campylobacteraceae  Campylobacter jejuni  C jejuni  Campylobacter fetus  C fetus  Arcobacter  C jejuni subspecies doylei  Campylobacter coli  Campylobacter upsaliensis  Campylobacter Lari  C fetus subspecies fetus  Campylobacter hyointestinalis 

Campylobacteriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the genus Campylobacter. Most people who become ill with campylobacteriosis get diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever within two to five days after exposure to the organism. The diarrhea may be bloody and can be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The illness typically lasts one week. Some infected persons do not have any symptoms. In persons with compromised immune systems, Campylobacter occasionally spreads to the bloodstream and causes a serious life-threatening infection.

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CDC

Infectious disease Campylobacter clinical Foodborne illnesses | CDC

arthritis  campylobacter  meningitis  campylobacteriosis  Helicobacter pylori  Urinary Tract Infection  Pancreatitis  Campylobacter infections  Campylobacteraceae  Campylobacter jejuni  C jejuni  Campylobacter fetus  C fetus  Arcobacter  C jejuni subspecies doylei  Campylobacter coli  Campylobacter upsaliensis  Campylobacter Lari  C fetus subspecies fetus  Campylobacter hyointestinalis 

Campylobacteriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the genus Campylobacter. Most people who become ill with campylobacteriosis get diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever within two to five days after exposure to the organism. The diarrhea may be bloody and can be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The illness typically lasts one week. Some infected persons do not have any symptoms. In persons with compromised immune systems, Campylobacter occasionally spreads to the bloodstream and causes a serious life-threatening infection.

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CDC

Preventing Chronic Disease | Comparison of Fecal Occult Blood Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening in an Alaska Native Population With High Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection, 2008 to 2012 - CDC

CDC  Helicobacter pylori  Colonoscopy  alaska native  sensitivity  specificity  Preventing Chronic Disease  PCD  Colorectal Neoplasms  immunochemical  occult blood 

Alaska Native colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. CRC screening using guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBT) are not recommended for Alaska Native people because of false-positive results associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated hemorrhagic gastritis. This study evaluated whether the newer immunochemical FOBT (iFOBT) resulted in a lower false-positive rate and higher specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia than gFOBT in a population with elevated prevalence of H. pylori infection.

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NIDDK

Peptic Ulcer Disease

Digestive Diseases  Helicobacter pylori  Peptic Ulcers  NSAIDs  H pylori infection  H pylori  Peptic ulcer disease  Esophageal ulcer  Ulcers 

A sore on the lining of your stomach or duodenum. People who take NSAIDs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen long-term, are infected with the bacteria H.pylori, or have a tumor in the stomach, duodenum, or pancreas are more likely to develop peptic ulcers.

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