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Informative text from the FDA to place on your tobacco prevention website.
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Youth and Tobacco


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Tobacco has serious effects on the health of users. For example, smoking harms nearly every organ in the body and leads to premature death.1 The consequences of tobacco use threaten Americans in many ways, including the following:

Youth and Tobacco

  • Nearly 9 out of 10 adult daily smokers smoked their first cigarette by the age of 18.1
  • Young brains are still developing. That may be one reason many teens feel dependent on tobacco after using it for only a short time.2 Because of nicotine addiction, 3 out of 4 teen smokers will become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit after a few years.3
  • Even young adults under the age of 30 who started smoking in their teens and early twenties can develop smoking-related health problems, such as early cardiovascular disease, smaller lungs that don't function normally, wheezing that can lead to being diagnosed with asthma, or DNA damage that can cause cancer almost anywhere in the body.2
References

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: US Dept of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: We CAN Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: US Dept of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.
3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults (Fact Sheet). Atlanta, GA: US Dept of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.


Audience: Youth, Public Health Professionals, Educators, Family & Advocates, Healthcare Providers, School Nurses

Topics: Cigarettes, Prevention, Science & Research

Source: https://www.fda.gov/tobacco-products/public-health-education/health-information